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The Enjoyable Garden

All creative outlets should be enjoyable; gardening is no exception. Learn how a thoughtful, well-designed garden can enhance the enjoyment of all that interact with it. From the birds and bees and the soil microorganisms to you the gardener, the potential for a garden to enrich has no bounds. Wrap up the season at the Creutzburg Center garden with this reflective class on why we garden and how we can do it better.

Code: HG42003
Dates: September 27, 2018
Meets: 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: Creutzburg Center
Instructor: Chris Fehlhaber, Assistant Horticulturist, Chanticleer Garden
$39.00 Course Fee
Save $9 with a MLSN Membership

The Benefits & Ecology of a Moss Lawn

Mosses, plants in the Bryophyta division, have been around for more than 400 million years making them old enough to have predated dinosaurs and tough enough to have survived being walked around on by all kinds of large, prehistoric creatures. Dinosaurs have since gone extinct, while moss is still thriving! If you are a habitat enthusiast, fed up with fussing over a high-maintenance lawn, explore the benefits of moss as an alternative for turf lawn.

http://content.yardmap.org/learn/benefits-ecology-moss-lawn/

Global Big Day 2018: a birding world record

Birds are incredible. Their power to inspire and amaze brings people together across every imaginable boundary. Global Big Day is the embodiment of this worldwide connectedness: a single day to celebrate birds in every place on Earth. On 5 May, Global Big Day, 28,000 people ventured outside in 170 countries, finding 6899 species: 2/3rds of the world’s bird species in one day. This is a new world record for birding and more birds seen by the Global Big Day team than any one person has ever seen in an entire year. Incredibly, more than 10% of species were reported by only one person, showing the impact that you have. This record belongs to every single person who took part. Thank you, and congratulations.

https://ebird.org/news/global-big-day-2018-a-birding-world-record

Hot Issues in the Delaware River Basin: How You Can Be Affected

The Delaware River Basin covers over 13,500 square miles and the Philadelphia region is near the bottom. Many actions and inactions upstream can affect your waters. Issues of water allocation, point and non-point source pollution, estuary issues, status of the natural gas drilling ban, value of headwaters and governance will be discussed. Learn how these issues affect the Delaware Watershed, how they impact you and what changes are needed to address climate change and other concerns of the future.

Code: LH22002
Dates: May 22, 2018
Meets: 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
Location: Creutzburg Center Porch
Instructor: Instructor Information
$35.00 Course Fee
Save $8 with a MLSN Membership

Notes: Includes light appetizers/wine & beer. Schedule: Reception – 5:30 pm to 6 pm; Program 6 pm to 7:30 pm

The Nourishing Garden

Gardens are places of beauty. They are also places of rejuvenation for the mind, body and spirit. Learn how gardening smarter can help improve your time gardening and your well-being. Thoughtful planting with regard to the site and plants combined with strategic maintenance allows for a garden that nourishes the site as well as the gardener. Ecological maintenance practices, plant selection and site considerations will all be discussed.

Code: HG42002
Dates: July 26, 2018
Meets: 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: Creutzburg Center
Instructor: Chris Fehlhaber, Assistant Horticulturist, Chanticleer Garden
$39.00 Course Fee
Save $9 with a MLSN Membership

Claudia West Presentation

Radnor Memorial Library and Chanticleer Garden welcomed author and consultant Claudia West to the Radnor Township Building for a presentation about designing plant communities.

Drawing upon her 2015 book Planting In A Post-Wild World, West spoke about “bridging the gap between horticulture and ecology” by combining the dense and diverse beauty of wild plant communities with the orderly structure of ornamental plantings.

Planting In A Post-Wild-World
Planting In A Post-Wild-World

Ms. West shared 3 pillars of theory when contemplating a design:

  • Relating plants to people
  • Relating plants to place
  • Relating plants to other plants

“Plantings are under-vegetated,” she added, and a thoughtful design can yield positive ecological and practical results, benefitting insects and birds in addition to providing visual appeal or tackling issues such as storm water management.

For more information about Claudia West, her firm and work, please visit phytostudio.com.

When to Expect Hummingbirds in Your Yard This Spring

Eastern United States

Over most of the eastern two-thirds of North America, from central Canada southward, the Ruby-throated Hummingbird reigns supreme. Predominantly a neotropical migrant, it winters from southern Mexico to Costa Rica. Each spring, this species arrives in numbers along the Gulf Coast by early March, filtering northward over the next two months until arriving in northern states and southern provinces by late April or early May. Migrating males usually arrive a week or so before females at any given location. Climate change is affecting the migration of Ruby-throats, though. As conditions warm on the wintering grounds, data indicate that they leave their winter homes earlier on their way to the Gulf Coast. Interestingly, it also appears that hummingbirds then hang around in the Gulf Coast for longer than normal, perhaps to recuperate from their trip across the Gulf of Mexico.