Category Archives: Articles

What is nectar dearth?

Summer is a pleasant time for many creatures, but for bees, it can be a challenge.

This season is a common time for nectar dearth. As the name implies, a nectar dearth is a time of nectar scarcity. These periods differ from area to area, but they are marked by high temperatures when flowers are dry. The transition between seasons, like spring to summer and summer to autumn, when plants are ending and beginning their respective life cycles, can also result in a dearth.

https://www.mnn.com/your-home/organic-farming-gardening/stories/what-nectar-dearth

Win a free spot in the Cornell Lab’s warbler identification course

Do you enjoy watching fall warblers in the Americas, but could use some tips and tricks for identification? We can help! We’re excited to partner with the Cornell Lab’s Bird Academy to offer a suite of exciting educational resources in thanks for your eBirding: in August, every eligible checklist that you submit gives you a chance to get free access to Be a Better Birder: Warbler Identification Series

https://ebird.org/news/win-a-free-spot-in-the-cornell-labs-warbler-identification-course-august

Annual eBird taxonomy update coming

August is always an exciting time of year for eBird—when we update all eBird records with the latest scientific advances in bird taxonomy. New information on species limits can result in increases (splits) or decreases (lumps) in your list totals. Whenever possible, we change your records for you to match the expected species when a split occurs—this is one of the main services we provide at eBird. Expect 2018’s update in the second or third week of August.

https://ebird.org/news/annual-ebird-taxonomy-update-coming

October Big Day—6 October 2018

Global Big Day has set new heights for a single day of birding each of the past four Mays. This massively international collaborative birding event has been so great that we’re having another worldwide eBird Big Day! From hundreds of Ross’s Gulls in northern Alaska to springtime in Australia, South Africa, and southern South America, October brings fun birding to the whole world. Mark your calendar for the first October Big Day: 6 October. Let’s see what we can find together on the first October Big Day!

Stay tuned for more information in coming weeks, and start planning your October 6 birding!

Humans are helping this rare bird learn how to migrate again

The northern bald ibis (Geronticus eremita) was once a common sight in northern and eastern Africa, the Middle East and portions of southern and central Europe. Today, the bird is critically endangered in the wild. Some 600 individuals reside in Morocco while another semi-wild group of 200 lives in Turkey.

https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/stories/northern-bald-ibis-waldrapp-return-europe

https://e360.yale.edu/features/after-a-400-year-absence-waldrapp-rare-ibis-returns-to-european-skies

Six Things I Learned by Scoping Out Baby Birds and Their Parents

From helpless chicks to sassy fledglings, baby birds make quite the journey as they grow. I’ve observed some fascinating behaviors while watching them in the Adirondack wilderness of New York during scouting trips for my avian tours. Studying them for hours from a safe distance helps me understand the trials of surviving in the wild (an important perspective for guides and frankly, anyone who wants to be a dedicated birder). But more importantly, it’s taught me that birds are the hardiest of creatures. Even in their most vulnerable stages, they find ways to stay unscathed—often with a little backup from their parents.

https://www.audubon.org/news/six-things-i-learned-scoping-out-baby-birds-and-their-parents

Preventing disease: What’s the best way to clean your bird feeders?

Preventing disease: What’s the best way to clean your bird feeders?Feeding birds can be a great source of joy, but feeders can increase the risk of disease transmission in the birds we love if feeders are not cleaned adequately. What’s the best cleaning method to prevent the spread of disease? According to an article published in the March issue of The Wilson Journal of Ornithology, researchers at Kutztown University in Pennsylvania recently conducted a study to determine the most effective way to reduce levels of Salmonella enterica enterica bacteria on wild bird feeders.

https://feederwatch.org/blog/cleaning-preventing-disease/