Category Archives: Education

Birding with MLSN & Radnor Conservancy

Experience the exciting hobby of bird watching. Find out what you need and what’s new in field guides and electronic gadgets. Discuss the art and science of bird identification, as well as the best times and places to go. Walk will include birding basics and binocular training. Dress for the weather and be prepared to walk a trail. We will walk rain or shine. Any skill level welcome.

Code: TT31067
Dates: September 26, 2018
Meets: 8:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Location: The Willows
Instructor: Phil Witmer
$18.00 Course Fee
Save $6 with a MLSN Membership

http://www.mainlineschoolnight.org/CourseStatus.awp?&course=18FTT31067

What is nectar dearth?

Summer is a pleasant time for many creatures, but for bees, it can be a challenge.

This season is a common time for nectar dearth. As the name implies, a nectar dearth is a time of nectar scarcity. These periods differ from area to area, but they are marked by high temperatures when flowers are dry. The transition between seasons, like spring to summer and summer to autumn, when plants are ending and beginning their respective life cycles, can also result in a dearth.

https://www.mnn.com/your-home/organic-farming-gardening/stories/what-nectar-dearth

Win a free spot in the Cornell Lab’s warbler identification course

Do you enjoy watching fall warblers in the Americas, but could use some tips and tricks for identification? We can help! We’re excited to partner with the Cornell Lab’s Bird Academy to offer a suite of exciting educational resources in thanks for your eBirding: in August, every eligible checklist that you submit gives you a chance to get free access to Be a Better Birder: Warbler Identification Series

https://ebird.org/news/win-a-free-spot-in-the-cornell-labs-warbler-identification-course-august

Annual eBird taxonomy update coming

August is always an exciting time of year for eBird—when we update all eBird records with the latest scientific advances in bird taxonomy. New information on species limits can result in increases (splits) or decreases (lumps) in your list totals. Whenever possible, we change your records for you to match the expected species when a split occurs—this is one of the main services we provide at eBird. Expect 2018’s update in the second or third week of August.

https://ebird.org/news/annual-ebird-taxonomy-update-coming

Six Things I Learned by Scoping Out Baby Birds and Their Parents

From helpless chicks to sassy fledglings, baby birds make quite the journey as they grow. I’ve observed some fascinating behaviors while watching them in the Adirondack wilderness of New York during scouting trips for my avian tours. Studying them for hours from a safe distance helps me understand the trials of surviving in the wild (an important perspective for guides and frankly, anyone who wants to be a dedicated birder). But more importantly, it’s taught me that birds are the hardiest of creatures. Even in their most vulnerable stages, they find ways to stay unscathed—often with a little backup from their parents.

https://www.audubon.org/news/six-things-i-learned-scoping-out-baby-birds-and-their-parents

Preventing disease: What’s the best way to clean your bird feeders?

Preventing disease: What’s the best way to clean your bird feeders?Feeding birds can be a great source of joy, but feeders can increase the risk of disease transmission in the birds we love if feeders are not cleaned adequately. What’s the best cleaning method to prevent the spread of disease? According to an article published in the March issue of The Wilson Journal of Ornithology, researchers at Kutztown University in Pennsylvania recently conducted a study to determine the most effective way to reduce levels of Salmonella enterica enterica bacteria on wild bird feeders.

https://feederwatch.org/blog/cleaning-preventing-disease/

Pollinator Garden Plants and Practices

For millions of years, flowering plants have engaged in an intricate ecological dance, evolving to protect themselves from predators and pathogens while, at the same time, developing ways to attract potential pollinators–both important parts of the plant’s life cycle. Pollinators, too, have been tied up in this tango, a back and forth of creating and overcoming attraction and resistance, access and exclusion, which, over time, has pushed each other to be perfect partners in their biological ballet. Here, we explore the intimate connections plants and pollinators depend on for survival and how this understanding can enhance our own efforts when gardening for wildlife.

http://content.yardmap.org/learn/pollinator-plants-practices/