Category Archives: Plants & Gardens

Yards With Non-Native Plants Create ‘Food Deserts’ for Bugs and Birds

Desirée Narango has knocked on hundreds of doors in the outskirts of Washington, D.C. to make an intimate request of homeowners: permission to count and identify the trees and shrubs in their yards. Luckily for Narango, now an ecologist at the City University of New York, they almost always said yes. In her counts, she’s found the tropical fronds of banana plants, pink-tufted crepe myrtles, scraggly oaks, and hundreds of other woody plants. But her interest in the greenery isn’t that of a botanist. “We’re thinking at the scale of a bird,” Narango says.

https://www.audubon.org/news/yards-non-native-plants-create-food-deserts-bugs-and-birds

Beyond the Birdfeeder: What Birds Are Really Looking For in Your Yard

Class will begin with a walk to observe birds at Chanticleer and conclude with a presentation that reviews common birds of Pennsylvania, resource needs of these birds, migratory species and species of concern, and what to plant to attract specific birds. Participants will learn to identify key indicators that demonstrate whether a property is contributing to migratory and common bird populations and how they might improve their practices to do so.

Instructor: Steve Saffier, Audubon PA Program Manager, Bird Friendly Communities
Location: Chanticleer Gardens
786 Church Road, Wayne, PA, 19087
Date: Saturday October 20, 2018
Time: 8:00-10:00 AM
Price: $35 per class

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Putting the Garden to Bed

Make the most of your work in the garden this fall while preparing it for the winter months. Chanticleer Assistant Horticulturist, Chris Fehlhaber will demonstrate essential gardening techniques that ensure your garden will be more manageable in the spring. From cutting back to thinning and dividing plants, re-establishing bed lines and seeding plants into the soil directly, this class will give you a checklist of fall cleanup tasks that improve your efficiency and planning.

Location: Chanticleer Garden
786 Church Road, Wayne, PA, 19087
Date: October 27, 2018
Time: 9:30-11:30 AM
Price: $25 PHS Members; $35 Non-Members

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Solitary Bee House: A Hands-on Workshop

Gardeners can easily encourage solitary bees by providing artificial nest sites, sometimes called “bee houses.” In this hands-on workshop, participants will build their own bee house, while learning about benefits of raising solitary bees. This class will bring attention to the benefits that solitary bees bring to our gardens. This class is not appropriate for children under 10, anyone below age 16 should be accompanies by an adult.

Instructor: Lowery Douglass, Assistant Horticulturist, Chanticleer
Location: Chanticleer Gardens
786 Church Road, Wayne, PA, 19087
Date: Saturday, October 6, 2018
Time: 9:00-11:00 AM
Price: $45 per class

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Tyler Arboretum: Winterizing Your Garden

Saturday October 13
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Is your garden ready for the winter chill? Not sure how to help your garden through the winter? Join Joe Daniels, Delaware County Master Gardener, to learn the steps for proper seasonal garden maintenance focused on perennials, shrubs, trees and lawn to get your garden ready for its spring awakening. Come with your gardening questions!

https://3828.blackbaudhosting.com/3828/Winterizing-Your-Garden

How This Popular Garden Plant May Spread Parasites That Harm Monarchs

For monarch butterflies in the eastern United States, life revolves around milkweed, a group of about 100 plants in the genus Asclepius that provide food, shelter and nectar for the iconic insects. During their annual migration to the their overwintering sites in the mountains of Mexico, millions of the butterflies float from milkweed to milkweed and other native flowers, on an epic 2,000-mile journey. But in recent years, things have gotten dicey for the orange and black lepidopteron on their journey.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/how-popular-garden-plant-may-spread-monarch-parasite-180970257/

What is nectar dearth?

Summer is a pleasant time for many creatures, but for bees, it can be a challenge.

This season is a common time for nectar dearth. As the name implies, a nectar dearth is a time of nectar scarcity. These periods differ from area to area, but they are marked by high temperatures when flowers are dry. The transition between seasons, like spring to summer and summer to autumn, when plants are ending and beginning their respective life cycles, can also result in a dearth.

https://www.mnn.com/your-home/organic-farming-gardening/stories/what-nectar-dearth

Pollinator Garden Plants and Practices

For millions of years, flowering plants have engaged in an intricate ecological dance, evolving to protect themselves from predators and pathogens while, at the same time, developing ways to attract potential pollinators–both important parts of the plant’s life cycle. Pollinators, too, have been tied up in this tango, a back and forth of creating and overcoming attraction and resistance, access and exclusion, which, over time, has pushed each other to be perfect partners in their biological ballet. Here, we explore the intimate connections plants and pollinators depend on for survival and how this understanding can enhance our own efforts when gardening for wildlife.

http://content.yardmap.org/learn/pollinator-plants-practices/