Category Archives: Plants & Gardens

The Enjoyable Garden

All creative outlets should be enjoyable; gardening is no exception. Learn how a thoughtful, well-designed garden can enhance the enjoyment of all that interact with it. From the birds and bees and the soil microorganisms to you the gardener, the potential for a garden to enrich has no bounds. Wrap up the season at the Creutzburg Center garden with this reflective class on why we garden and how we can do it better.

Code: HG42003
Dates: September 27, 2018
Meets: 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: Creutzburg Center
Instructor: Chris Fehlhaber, Assistant Horticulturist, Chanticleer Garden
$39.00 Course Fee
Save $9 with a MLSN Membership

The Benefits & Ecology of a Moss Lawn

Mosses, plants in the Bryophyta division, have been around for more than 400 million years making them old enough to have predated dinosaurs and tough enough to have survived being walked around on by all kinds of large, prehistoric creatures. Dinosaurs have since gone extinct, while moss is still thriving! If you are a habitat enthusiast, fed up with fussing over a high-maintenance lawn, explore the benefits of moss as an alternative for turf lawn.

http://content.yardmap.org/learn/benefits-ecology-moss-lawn/

The Nourishing Garden

Gardens are places of beauty. They are also places of rejuvenation for the mind, body and spirit. Learn how gardening smarter can help improve your time gardening and your well-being. Thoughtful planting with regard to the site and plants combined with strategic maintenance allows for a garden that nourishes the site as well as the gardener. Ecological maintenance practices, plant selection and site considerations will all be discussed.

Code: HG42002
Dates: July 26, 2018
Meets: 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: Creutzburg Center
Instructor: Chris Fehlhaber, Assistant Horticulturist, Chanticleer Garden
$39.00 Course Fee
Save $9 with a MLSN Membership

Claudia West Presentation

Radnor Memorial Library and Chanticleer Garden welcomed author and consultant Claudia West to the Radnor Township Building for a presentation about designing plant communities.

Drawing upon her 2015 book Planting In A Post-Wild World, West spoke about “bridging the gap between horticulture and ecology” by combining the dense and diverse beauty of wild plant communities with the orderly structure of ornamental plantings.

Planting In A Post-Wild-World
Planting In A Post-Wild-World

Ms. West shared 3 pillars of theory when contemplating a design:

  • Relating plants to people
  • Relating plants to place
  • Relating plants to other plants

“Plantings are under-vegetated,” she added, and a thoughtful design can yield positive ecological and practical results, benefitting insects and birds in addition to providing visual appeal or tackling issues such as storm water management.

For more information about Claudia West, her firm and work, please visit phytostudio.com.

Come to Know the Plants

Plants are the foundation of any garden. Creating a successful, enjoyable space that works depends on choosing the right ones. Intimately knowing your plants makes gardening more rewarding, enjoyable and less work. Learn how great plants can come together to form a dynamic, self-reliant community. After a brief lecture, get ready to get your hands in the soil as we start to plant the new Creutzburg Center entrance garden.

Code: HG42001
Dates: May 3, 2018
Meets: 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: Creutzburg Center
Instructor: Chris Fehlhaber of Chanticleer Garden
$39.00 Course Fee
Save $9 with a MLSN Membership

Pitch in a Patch for Pollinators

Presented by Habitat Network, The Nature Conservancy, and The Cornell Lab of Ornithology

This spring, Pitch in a Patch for Pollinators. We know pollinators need habitat to thrive–can you commit just a little more space for a new pollinator patch? Each of us has a role we can play in stitching together vibrant, healthy habitat for our butterflies, bees, birds, bats, and various other pollinating wildlife.

http://content.yardmap.org/special-pages/pitch-patch-pollinators/

A Yard Full Of Native Plants Is A Yard Full Of Well-Fed Birds

Taking in the beautiful purple blossoms as the scent of lilac floats on the air seems like a pretty idyllic backyard setting, but new research shows that not all plants are equal. That pretty lilac, porcelain berry, fragrant bush honeysuckle, and ruby red Japanese maple in your yard might look nice, but non-native plants like these consistently have fewer caterpillars than native plants, according to new research published in July in Biological Conservation. And that means less food for birds.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/its-true-a-yard-full-of-native-plants-is-a-yard-full-of-well-fed-birds/

Removing Lawn to Make Way for More Habitat

Habitat Network, The Nature Conservancy and The Cornell Lab

“This article discusses several tried and true ways people remove lawn. From small patches to whole lawns–these techniques will get you started down the path to less lawn and more…pollinator flower beds? Trees? Shrubs? Veggie Garden? Your imagination is your only limit.”

http://content.yardmap.org/learn/removing-lawn-to-make-way-for-more-habitat/