Tyler Arboretum Bird Walk

January 23 @ 8:15 AM

Tyler Arboretum
515 Painter Road, Media, PA 19063
Phone: 610-566-9134

Tyler is a wonderful winter haven for non-migratory birds.
Explore Tyler’s winter landscapes with experienced birders who
know all the best places to look. Birders of all experience levels welcome.

Bring bird guides and binoculars if you have them. Meet at the
Visitor Center

https://www.tylerarboretum.org/events/winter-bird-walks/2019-01-23/

Preparing for the Great Backyard Bird Count

Date: February 2, 2019
Time: 10am
Location: Radnor Memorial Library Winsor Room

This event is presented by Radnor Memorial Library, Radnor Conservancy, Bird Towns of Radnor and Tredyffrin/Easttown.

How can you and your family learn about birds and contribute to science? Get involved with the National Audubon Society Great Backyard Bird Count 2019! Phil Witmer, past president of the Delaware Valley Ornithological Club, will familiarize you with some of the common winter birds you may see in your backyard and show you how you can participate in the 2019 GBBC which takes place from Friday, February 15 through Monday, February 18. Raffle prizes courtesy of Lou Muth at Do It Best Hardware of Wayne.

http://www.radnorlibrary.org/event/preparing-for-the-great-backyard-bird-count/

Birdist Rule #96: Know Which Wrens Live Near You

Wrens aren’t our flashiest birds, but they more than make up for it with their big personalities. Small and brown, they rarely sit still, whether vigorously defending their nests and territories, pecking for food on the forest floor, or just incessantly chattering away. They’ll get into shouting matches and physical confrontations with interlopers, including much larger species and humans, and even destroy eggs of other birds. In other words, wrens don’t mess around.

https://www.audubon.org/news/birdist-rule-96-know-which-wrens-live-near-you

In memory of species declared extinct in 2018 — plus one we’ve already lost in 2019

Earth is losing wildlife at an alarming pace, a crisis many scientists now describe as a mass extinction event. The planet has seen several mass extinctions before, but this is the first in human history — and the first with human help. Wild plants and animals are vanishing amid a storm of human-induced disasters, namely habitat loss, unsustainable hunting, invasive species, pollution and climate change.

https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/blogs/species-extinct-2018

Spoiler Alert: Can Gray Jays Survive Warmer Weather?

“Where’d they go?”

Scientist Ryan Norris was puzzled. Just moments ago, two doting Gray Jays were bouncing about the nearby spruce trees like Labrador retrievers happy to see their owner. When he wrapped a couple of cotton balls around one of the spruce tips, his rotund chums had quickly seized upon the offering. Cotton comes in handy for birds when they’re in need of insulation material for nest construction.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/spoiler-alert-can-gray-jays-survive-warmer-weather/